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Adaptation

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Summary

The default setting of the global clock above is the ‘2°C scenario‘. It is now evident that multiple dangerous tipping points will be triggered well before reaching 2°C, resulting catastrophic climate conditions globally. To keep the planet habitable for most (but not all) people, global average temperatures must stay below 1.5°C.
 
Click on the ‘1.5°C scenario‘ box on the above right of the rotating planet: this shows that globally, we must stop emitting all greenhouse gases in less than 7 years, far sooner than the Government’s goal of ‘net zero by 2050’.

Even if the lukewarm promises made by governments in November 2021 are kept, the outcome of COP27 means the world is now on track to reach 2.4°C. To compound the problem, irreversible climate tipping points are being passed sooner than expected. Instead of absorbing greenhouse gases, large parts of natural world are now releasing them into the atmosphere, adding to what we’re emitting. And the pace is accelerating.

To mitigate the compounding impacts, we need to redouble our efforts to stop our emissions. But we must also face reality. We must adapt to increasingly wilder weather and rising sea levels. And we need to do so quickly.

In many instances, protecting and restoring native ecosystems (nature-based solutions) helps both mitigate and adapt to climate change. However, adaptation also requires developing and implementing tools that help communities cope with inevitable and unavoidable non-economic as well as economic losses, and avoiding bad decisions that result in costly and potentially deadly maladaptation.

A Local Government New Zealand report found that process of engaging with communities at risk to help make the best—albeit unpalatable—choices are hindered by a lack of resources, vague policies, and ill-defined laws. Currently, these outdated laws, which are not due to be replaced by the proposed Managed Retreat and Climate Change Act until late 2023, pit developers against councils faced with potential legal action for declining development and perversely, future legal action from affected owners for permitting that development. Moreover, any new legislation is planned to take some 10 years to come into full effect, subject to any change of government scrapping it.

Links in the menu at left aim to help address these and other problems. We will be adding more pages and links plus examples of community engagement strategies and outcomes, as time and funding allows.

Home > Adaptation

Summary

The default setting of the global clock above is the ‘2°C scenario‘. It is now evident that multiple dangerous tipping points will be triggered well before reaching 2°C, resulting catastrophic climate conditions globally. To keep the planet habitable for most (but not all) people, global average temperatures must stay below 1.5°C.
 
Click on the ‘1.5°C scenario‘ box on the above right of the rotating planet: this shows that globally, we must stop emitting all greenhouse gases in less than 7 years, far sooner than the Government’s goal of ‘net zero by 2050’.

Even if the lukewarm promises made by governments in November 2021 are kept, we’re now on track to reach 2.4°C. To compound the problem, irreversible climate tipping points are being passed sooner than expected. Instead of absorbing greenhouse gases, large parts of natural world are now releasing them into the atmosphere, adding to what we’re emitting. And the pace is accelerating.

To mitigate the compounding impacts, we need to redouble our efforts to stop our emissions. But we must also face reality. We must adapt to increasingly wilder weather and rising sea levels. And we need to do so quickly.

In many instances, protecting and restoring native ecosystems (nature-based solutions) helps both mitigate and adapt to climate change. However, adaptation also requires developing and implementing tools that help communities cope with inevitable and unavoidable non-economic as well as economic losses, and avoiding bad decisions that result in costly and potentially deadly maladaptation.

A Local Government New Zealand report found that process of engaging with communities at risk to help make the best—albeit unpalatable—choices are hindered by a lack of resources, vague policies, and ill-defined laws. Currently, these outdated laws, which are not due to be replaced by the proposed Managed Retreat and Climate Change Act
until late 2023, pit developers against councils faced with potential legal action for declining development and perversely, future legal action from affected owners for permitting that development.  Moreover, any new legislation is planned to take some 10 years to come into full effect, subject to any change of government scrapping it.

Links in the menu at left aim to help address these and other problems. We will be adding more pages and links plus examples of community engagement strategies and outcomes, as time and funding allows.

More information