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Climate Change & Nature Aotearoa New Zealand

Protect.  Restore.  Thrive.

Climate Change & Nature Aotearoa New Zealand

Protect. Restore. Thrive.


Gecko, fantail, and weta holding a 'Predator Free' trap in New Zealand native forest and streamOur goal: help everyone protect and restore our natural ecosystems so that we can all thrive in a changing climate


It’s time to be on the right side of history.” – Dr Rod Carr; Chair Climate Change Commission

To help us respond to these emergencies, this website is in 3 sections:

    Over 2,100 local governments in 39 countries including Aotearoa have declared a climate emergency.

    In 2021, the UN launched the Decade on Ecosystem Restoration because nature-based solutions must triple by 2030 to counter the dual climate and environmental crises.

    To help everyone respond to these emergencies, this website is in 3 sections :

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    “The time is now, Ināia tonu nei, to lead the change we want to see and to remain steadfast to the values that underpin our nationhood—values like whanaungatanga kaitiakitanga and manaakitanga.” – Climate Change Commission

    What we’re doing to restore our native ecosystems, te manu o te taiao, and tackle climate change. Every project, big and small, includes resources to help you become climate resilient:

    We would love to share what you’re doing in ‘your places’ too, please contact: manager@braid.org.nz.

    “Unless there are immediate and deep emission reductions across all sectors, limiting warming to 1.5C degrees will be beyond reach.” – Jim Skea WGIII co-ordinator.

    Explainers

    With a focus on Canterbury, this site includes resources relevant to all of Aotearoa.
     

    Instructions for interactive graphs (Credit: The 2°Institute.)

    • Mouse over anywhere on the graphs to see the changes over the last thousand years.
    • To see time periods of your choice, hold your mouse button down on one section then drag the mouse across a few years, then release it.
    • To see how this compares to the past 800,000 years, click on the ‘time’ icon on the top left.
    • To return the graphs to their original position, double-click the time icon.
    • The annual ups and downs in the graph are because plants accumulate carbon in the spring and summer and release some back to the air in autumn and winter. As the northern hemisphere has more land and more plants, carbon dioxide levels go up in winter because plants become less productive. Annual measurements of carbon dioxide are an average of these ups and downs.
    Instructions for interactive graphs (Credit: The 2°Institute.)

    • Mouse over anywhere on the graphs to see the changes over the last thousand years.
    • To see time periods of your choice, hold your mouse button down on one section then drag the mouse across a few years, then release it.
    • To see how this compares to the past 800,000 years, click on the ‘time’ icon on the top left.
    • To return the graphs to their original position, double-click the time icon.
    • The annual ups and downs in the graph are because plants accumulate carbon in the spring and summer and release some back to the air in autumn and winter. As the northern hemisphere has more land and more plants, carbon dioxide levels go up in winter because plants become less productive. Annual measurements of carbon dioxide are an average of these ups and downs.